October 8, 2021
From PETA
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As most of the world is opening up after more than a year of lockdown, PETA is speaking out for animals imprisoned at SeaWorld and other abusement parks, who won’t get the same relief. With the help of Dancing With the Stars pro dancer Sharna Burgess, we’re launching a campaign to make this SeaWorld’s last dance and put an end to its exploitative animal acts.

Sharna Burgess in Anti SeaWorld PSA for PETA

Sharna Burgess of Dancing With the Stars in a Anti SeaWorld Ad for PETA

Born in Australia, Sharna says her love and respect for the ocean extend to the animals who call it home. “There’s been a few times in my life where I’ve seen wild dolphins and wild whales out in the ocean. And it’s so beautiful, and it’s magical,” she tells PETA. “You know, they’re not meant to be on show for us.” As a dancer, Sharna also understands how important it is to have the freedom to move—something orcas, who swim up to 140 miles a day in nature, and other dolphins also desire. But at marine parks around the world, these mammals are often kept in cramped, barren tanks, deprived of the opportunity to swim and satisfy other critical needs.

“It’s not just human beings that deserve to have rights and freedom—and the freedom to move. It’s our animals. It’s our wildlife.”

—Sharna Burgess to PETA

Tell SeaWorld to Stop Breeding Dolphins and Whales and Send Them to Seaside Sanctuaries!

More than 40 orcas have died on SeaWorld’s watch—many far short of their natural life expectancy. And let’s not forget the more than 300 other dolphins and whales and approximately 400 pinnipeds who have also lost their lives at the notorious abusement park. Because of PETA’s campaigns and mounting criticism of SeaWorld, the company ended its sordid orca-breeding program and then agreed to stop allowing trainers to stand on dolphins’ faces and backs in cruel circus-style shows. Nonetheless, 20 orcas are still suffering at SeaWorld, and other dolphins and whales are still being used as breeding machines to give birth to new generations of captive animals.




Source: Peta.org